Top 3 Professional Development Books

Posted 11/08/18 Team Vaco

You’re constantly investing in your clients, your colleagues and the work you do on a day-to-day basis, but when’s the last time you invested in yourself? One of the best ways to invest in yourself is with some (enjoyable!) professional development books. Whether on paper, screen, or through headphones, the three books below come highly endorsed by your New Jersey Vaconians.

Untethered Soul, by Michael A. Singer

It’s a personal development book, but often, both professional and personal development come from the same place. One section of the book teaches you that humans are taught to feel certain way, and this drives our thoughts. How does this relate to Vaco and our business? Most large staffing companies drive employees to adhere to specific metrics and principals rather than being “free.” Vaco allows its employees to be “free” to develop business in many ways and to foster relationships. We say “yes” to our clients and develop our processes and thoughts around their needs, rather than being in our own heads.

Who Moved My Cheese, by Spencer Johnson

This book helps with navigating the ever-changing landscape in your professional and personal life and explains that change is good, but it can also be very stressful. Coupled with a mental positive attitude to “Live your professional life 5-minutes at a time,” this book’s message helps separate the emotions of the ups and downs and gives each customer the unaltered, focused, genuine YOU!

Wooden: A Coach’s Life, by Seth Davis

This book is a biography about the legendary North Carolina Tarheel coach, John Wooden, and his career. Author Seth Davis shares life lessons taught and learned over forty years of Wooden’s unparalleled success as a coach and mentor. The most inspiring and interesting takeaway is seeing how Wooden mentored and coached everyone a little differently; based on talent levels, ego, player development, player beliefs, their background, and more. Wooden exemplified that the key to success is building a team based on utilizing each player’s strengths and honing-in on their motivations. Davis also emphasizes to never lapse on your morals or ethics for anything, because doing what right is never spoken about, but always remembered.